Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference and Exhibition on Polymer Chemistry Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Functional Polymers|Polymers for Catalysis|Bio catalysis in Polymer Chemistry|Bio-related Medical Polymers|Polymers in Biochemistry
Biography:

Mohammad Hassan Khanmirzaei has completed his PhD at the University of Malaya. Currently he is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at department of physics, University of Malaya. He has published some papers as first author in reputed Q1 and Q2 journals, has scored with 1 best award and 3 gold medals in technology and innovation Expos, has registered 2 patents and has been reviewed some manuscripts in reputed journals. His research interest is on electrochemical devices especially dye-sensitized solar cells and perovskite solar cells

Abstract:

Gel polymer electrolytes are investigated for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications by other researchers. This work is based on hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), sodium iodide (NaI), and 1–methyl–3–propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide (HMII) as imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) for gel polymer electrolyte preparation. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) as plasticizer, and iodine, I2 as redox mediator were used. There are three systems in this work. Systems I, II and III follow designations of HPC:EC:PC:xNaI, HPC:EC:PC:NaI:xMPII and HPC:EC:PC:NaI:xHMII, respectively, where x is 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 wt.% of HPC. The amounts of HPC, EC and PC were kept at 0.5 g, 5.0 g and 5.0 g respectively. In Systems II and III, the amount of NaI was kept at 0.5 g. Gel polymer electrolytes were analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The highest ionic conductivities of 3.95×10−3, 7.37×10−3 and 7.04×10−3 S cm−1 were achieved in systems I, II and III, respectively. Temperature-dependence ionic conductivity was studied in this work. Double-layer TiO2 paste was coated on FTO glass as photoactive electrode. Pt coated FTO glass was used as counter electrode. Photoactive electrode soaked in N719 dye for about 24 hr. The Polymer electrolytes were sandwiched between two anode and cathode electrodes for DSSC fabrication. The J-V characteristics of fabricated dye-sensitized solar cells were analyzed under Sun simulator. In systems I, II and III, the highest energy conversion efficiencies of 3.94, 5.79 and 6.24 % were achieved, respectively.

Biography:

Ying-Chieh Chao is currently pursuing PhD at National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. His main research focuses organic conjugated polymers and organic photovoltaics. He has developed a cross-linking system to efficiently maintain the thermal stability of organic photovoltaics. He is also a Lecturer at Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, New Taipei City, Taiwan

Abstract:

In this work, we prepared four star-shaped conjugated small molecules, the triphenylamine dithiophene (TBT) derivatives, namely TBT-H, TBT-Br, TBT-OH and TBT-N3 presenting hydride, bromide, hydroxyl and azide terminal functional groups, respectively. These TBT derivatives were used as additives in the active layers of organic photovoltaics to investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions (TBT-H, TBT-OH) or cross-linking (TBT-N3, TBT-Br) on the long-term thermal stability of the devices. From analyses of blend film morphologies and optoelectronic and device performance, we observed significant enhancements in thermal stability during accelerated heating tests at 150 °C for the devices incorporated with the additives TBT-N3 and TBT-Br. These two additives functioned as cross-linkers and constructed local borders that effectively impeded heat-promoted fullerene aggregation, thereby leading to highly stable morphologies. When compared with corresponding normal devices, the TBT-N3-derived devices based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) exhibited greater stability with the power conversion efficiency (PCE) remaining as high as 2.5% after 144 hours at 150 °C. Because of this enhancement, a device based on an amorphous low-band gap polymer, namely poly(thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-alt-benzodithiophene) with the addition of TBT-N3 was fabricated. We observed a significant improvement in device stability, retaining approximately 60% (from 5.0 to 3.3%) of its initial PCE under accelerated heating (150 °C). In contrast, the PCE of the corresponding normal device decayed to 0.01% of its initial value.

Kushal Sen

Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India

Title: Non-metallic electrically conducting textiles: The potential
Biography:

Kushal Sen obtained his BTech degree in Textile Chemistry in 1977 and PhD degree in 1981, both from Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. He joined the Department of Textile Technology, at IIT Delhi as a Faculty in 1981 and is currently a Professor in the same department and is also holding the position of Dean (Faculty). His current research interests include finishing of textiles, micro-encapsulation and electrically conductive textiles. He has guided several PhD and Masters’ theses in various areas of textile technology, viz., textile chemistry, texturing and fibre science. He has published more than 70 papers in journals and conferences.

Abstract:

Textiles, as we know, are polymeric and are electrically non-conducting. However, these are extremely flexible and comfortable. It has been of considerable interest to limited electrical conductivity through finishing treatment or through insertion of metallic fibers mainly to dissipate the static charge generated during use. The advent of intrinsically conducting polymers, however, has opened new vistas of applications wherein the flexibility of textiles could be suitably combined with the electrical conductivity of ICPs. The present paper gives an account of the research conducted by the team at IIT Delhi on in situ polymerization onto textiles of monomers such as pyrrole and thiophene using chemical and electro-chemical polymerization. Discussed in this paper are some fundamentals associated with polymerization process. In the case of electrochemical polymerization, it has been found that with the precise control of the relevant process parameters, uniform, rapid and reproducible polymerization can be achieved which can help to precisely control the polymer yield, as long as there is sufficient monomer concentration and requisite surface area for polymer deposition. The paper also discusses the potential and possible application areas of the electro-conductive textiles. 

Biography:

Žiga Štirn, Master of Science (Chemistry), is a Researcher at the Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana. He is currently pursuing his PhD in Chemical Engineering. His main research is focused on self-healing polymer materials based on Diels-Alder reaction.

Abstract:

Maleimide containing benzoxazine resins are known to have high glass transition temperatures (200 to 350°C) and good thermal stability, which is why they have vast potential as high performance materials. However, according to the literature, they lack the diversity, since most of these resins are derivatives of 4-hydroxyphenylmaleimide. Most commonly used synthetic approach for preparing benzoxazines with maleimide moieties is the reaction of 4- hydroxyphenylmaleimide with paraformaldehyde and desired amine. For that reason the diversity arises only from the amine substitution pattern as the phenolic part is kept unchanged in most of the resins. A novel approach towards preparation of maleimide containing benzoxazine resins is presented. Anilino maleimide species is produced by four step modification of 4,4- diaminodiphenylmethane with maleimide group. The derived compound is further used in the preparation of maleimide containing benzoxazines. This novel synthetic strategy significantly broadens the scope of structural diversification of maleimide containing benzoxazines and their high performance polymeric forms, due to the possibility of phenol diversification.

Biography:

Abstract:

The traditional methods for polymer processing involve either high temperatures, necessary for melting or viscosity reduction or hazardous organic solvents and chlorofluorocarbons. Due to the undesirable environmental and biological impact of these solvents, intensive research is focused on seeking new and cleaner methods for the processing of polymers. Applying supercritical fluids for particle formation may overcome the drawbacks of conventional particle size reduction processes. Powders and composites with special characteristics can be produced. Several processes for formation and design of solid particles using dense gases are studied intensively. The unique thermo-dynamic and fluid-dynamic properties of SCFs can be used also for impregnation of solid particles for formation of solid powderous emulsions, particle coating, e.g., for formation of solids with unique properties for the use in different applications. For production of particles with micron and submicron size, several methods using supercritical fluids like RESS and GASR, GASP, SAS/PCA/SEDS, SAA, UNICARB™, VAMP™, PGSSTM are described in the literature. The basis of practically all processes is fundamental thermodynamic data for the system polymer/dense gas. An overview of methods for investigation of the thermodynamic properties of the binary systems by different methods is offered. Binary system of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/CO2 as a model system to study the interactions of polymers with SCF at elevated pressures was taken under research. Behavior of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with different molar masses (ranging from 1,000 g/mol do 100,000 g/mol in the binary systems with CO2 was analyzed. The external balance method was developed for determination of the solubility of gas into substrates which are soluble in CO2 densities of CO2 saturated solutions of polyethylene glycols were measured by a volumetric method, developed by the authors. Viscosities of CO2 saturated solutions of polyethylene glycols at elevated pressures were measured by a method, also developed by the authors. Capillary rise method adapted to the measurement conditions and sample properties was applied to investigate the interfacial tension. In details PGSS (Particles from Gas Saturated Solutions) process co-invented by author of this manuscript (USP 6,056,791) for the formation and formulation fine particles will be presented. In this process melts, solutions, emulsion or suspensions are intensively mixed with compressed gas most frequently the gas is carbon dioxide. In PGSS™ process the substance or the mixture of substances to be powderized must be converted into a sprayable form by liquefaction/dissolution. This can be achieved by melting or/and dissolving of the substance or mixture of substances in a liquid solvent or by dispersing solids or liquids in a melt or solution and saturation of the melt/solution/dispersion with the gas. Thus, viscosity and surface tension is lowered to such extent that low and high viscous fluids can be sprayed in a nozzle forming fine droplets. Then the gas-containing solution is rapidly expanded in an expansion unit and the gas is evaporated. Due to the Joule-Thomson effect and/or the evaporation and the volume-expansion of the gas, the solution cools down below the solidification temperature of the solute and the supersaturation is extremely high. In this way, fine particles are obtained, where the morphology, particle size, particle size distribution and crystallinity (various polymorphs) can be adjusted with operating process parameters. The presentation gives also limited overview of applications of sub-and supercritical fluids as processing media for production of novel materials with special properties

Biography:

Jin Ho Lee graduated in Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, USA with PhD degree in 1988. Since 1993, he is a Professor in the Department of Advanced Materials, Hannam University, South Korea. He was a President of Korean Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society (KTERMS) (2012) and served as Conference Chair in Asia-Pacific Meeting of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Societies (TERMIS-AP) (2014). His research area includes biomaterials for tissue engineering and bioactive molecules delivery. He published more than 220 scientific research papers, 35 book chapters, and 55 patents.

 

Abstract:

The many biological processes in the body are mediated by physical or biochemical signal gradients. There are many kinds of signal gradients in the body, including chemotaxis, heptotaxis, and mechanotaxis. These signal gradients induce the differentiation of stem cells to specific target cells and thus can regenerate target tissues or organs. So, if we can control these physical or biochemical signals and their gradients, we may be able to have more control cell behaviors and enhance tissue formation. We have tried to fabricate various 2D and 3D physical and biochemical gradients for differentiation of stem cells to regenerate target tissues. Among the polymer matrices with these signal gradients, pore size, stiffness, and growth factor gradients to control stem cell differentiations and target tissue regeneration will be discussed in this presentation.

Biography:

Cornelia Gabriela Palivan was born in Brasov, Romania where she was educated until University level. She obtained both her BSc (1982) and MSc (1983) degrees at the University of Bucharest. After 7 years at the Institute of Chemical & Pharmaceutical Research, Bucharest, as project leader in various drug research oriented projects, Cornelia took up a position as Teaching Assistant at the University of Bucharest. Between 1992 - 1994, she made the experimental part of her PhD under the supervision of Professor Michel Geoffroy at the University of Geneva where her long held interest in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of metal complexes began. In 1995, she gained her PhD degrees with Summa cum Laudae at the University of Bucharest, under the supervision of Professor Voicu Grecu. Two years later, Cornelia was appointed as a University Lecturer at Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest. In 1999, she moved to the Department of Chemistry at the University of Basel where she was involved in projects using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to characterise paramagnetic centers in free radicals, metal complexes, and proteins.

Abstract:

Modern medicine is focusing on the development of new concepts that combine multifunctional compounds with stable, safe carriers or membranes in patient-oriented diagnostics or therapeutic strategies. Suitable amphiphilic block copolymers can self-assemble into 3D supramolecular assemblies, such as compartments with sizes in the nanometer range, or membranes mimicking biological membranes. Compared to conventional, low molar mass building blocks (e.g. lipids), membranes based on macromolecular self-assembly have advantages of superior stability, robustness, and possibility to tailor their physical, chemical, and biological properties. Here, we present protein-decorated membranes as selective permeable walls of compartments or as bilayers on solid support that provide distinct spaces for desired reactions at the nanometer scale. Biopores and channel proteins inserted into the polymer membrane of compartments selectively control the exchange of substrates and products with the environment. In this was they support an in situ activity of the encapsulated enzymes, and therefore the development of artificial organelles mimicking natural organelles, upon up-take in cells. Biopores and membrane proteins inserted in solid supported polymer membranes serve to mediate a transport of ions/molecules through the membrane, and therefore to induce biofunctionality. The encapsulation and/or insertion of active molecules (enzymes, proteins, mimics) in polymers compartments and membranes provide functionality to the hybrid materials, while the synthetic membranes support their stability and robustness, as essential factors for applications. The properties of such membranes can be extensively controlled via chemical composition, molecular weight and the hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic block length ratio of the polymers. These nanoscience based concepts open new avenues in protein therapy (artificial organelles) as well as sensing approaches (active” surfaces).

Speaker
Biography:

Arildo José Braz de Oliveira has completed his PhD in Organic Chemistry at the age of 34 years at State University of Campinas and postdoctoral studies at Federal University of Parana in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, in Brazil. He has experience in Natural Products Chemistry and Biotechnology of Medicinal Plants, acting on the following topics: Production of primary and secondary metabolites in plant cell cultures, isolation and identification of natural bioactive substances as alkaloids, fatty acids and polysaccharides. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been acting as a reviewer some of these.

Abstract:

This study discusses and shows as to determine the degree of polymerization (DP) of inulin, exemplified by samples obtained from roots of Brazilian medicinal plants as Stevia rebaudiana and Pfaffia glomerata, using different analytical methodologies as colorimetric methods, gel permeation chromatography coupled to multiangle laser light scattering and refractive index detectors (GPC/MALLS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (GC/MS), electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). It will be shown that these techniques and others can be used together to give complementary information thus providing a more accurate estimate of the overall DP of the inulin like molecules.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Various block copolymers comprising enantiomeric polylactides (PLLA and/or PDLA depending on the enantiomeric chains) and poly(oxyethylene) (PEG) were prepared to analyze the structural effects on the formation of core-shell nanoparticles in aqueous media. It was found out that the micelle particle structure and stability can be correlated with the position of streocomplex (sc) crystallization inside the micelle cores. This finding gives an insight into the dynamic and static mechanisms of macromolecular aggregation and ordering, particularly, into the process of sol-gel formation in the mixed micellar solution of the enantiomeric PEG-PLA block copolymers. Also we succeeded in synthesizing several copolymer mixtures of furan-terminated diblock copolymers (F-PEG-PLA) and triblock copolymers (PLA-PEG-PLA) having different compositions by ROP of L- and D-lactides using partially furanylated PEGs as the macro initiators. Each of the copolymer mixtures obtained was dispersed into an aqueous medium to prepare mixed micelle solutions of the enantiomeric copolymer mixtures in the presence and absence of a coupling agent 1,8-bis(maleimido)diethylene glycol (BMG). The BMG-added mixed micelle solutions turned to gel states having higher storage moduli (11 kPa) than their corresponding BMG-free micelle solutions. The former systems were thought to be controlled by the dual cross-linking mechanisms for the gel formation; physically by sc formation between the enantiomeric PLA block chains and chemically by Diels-Alder coupling between the furanyl terminals on PEG blocks and BMG. These sol-gel systems are not only interesting in terms of tuning the self-assembling micelle formation and sol-gel transition but also promising to provide injectable scaffolds in the tissue engineering.